METEOTSUNAMI RISK AND THE USE OF DYNAMIC MOORING ANALYSIS AND SHORETENSION TO MITIGATE RISK IN FREMANTLE PORT
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How to Cite

Hudson, R., & Cross, J. (2020). METEOTSUNAMI RISK AND THE USE OF DYNAMIC MOORING ANALYSIS AND SHORETENSION TO MITIGATE RISK IN FREMANTLE PORT. Coastal Engineering Proceedings, (36v), management.27. https://doi.org/10.9753/icce.v36v.management.27

Abstract

Meteotsunamis are generated by meteorological events, particularly moving pressure disturbances due to squalls, thunderstorms, frontal passages and atmospheric gravity waves. Relatively small initial sea-level perturbations, of the order of a few centimetres, can increase significantly through multi-resonant phenomena to create tsunami like destructive events resulting in injury, loss of life, damage to infrastructure and significant economic loss. On the 17th August 2014, severe metocean conditions (including 27.8 m/s wind gusts and a meteotsunami) resulted in the vessels Grand Pioneer and AAL Fremantle breaking loose from their mooring at Berth 11 and 12 in Fremantle Port. One of the vessels collided with a railway bridge closing the commuter railway line for two weeks. Royal HaskoningDHV was commissioned by Fremantle Ports to undertake a hydrodynamic investigation and a dynamic mooring analysis (DMA) to determine the cause of the event and provide a technical solution to provide safe moorings in the port.

Recorded Presentation from the vICCE (YouTube Link): https://youtu.be/idTLjfeajiM
https://doi.org/10.9753/icce.v36v.management.27
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References

Pattiaratchi & Wijeratne (2015): Are meteotsunamis an underrated hazard? Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 373: 20140377. http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsta.2014.0377

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