LESSONS LEARNED FROM RAPID DEPLOYMENT OF WAVE GAGES AND CAMERAS DURING HURRICANE IRMA

  • Navid H. Jafari
  • Qin J. Chen
  • Cody Johnson
  • Jack Cadigan
  • Brian Harris

Abstract

Hurricane Irma was a category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale. Irma developed from a tropical wave around the Cape Verde Islands. The National Hurricane Center started monitoring it on August 26, and it was classified as a tropical storm named Irma on August 30. Moving across the Atlantic Ocean, Irma increased in strength. On September 5, Irma was classified as a category 5 hurricane with wind speeds up to 175 mph (280 km/h). Irma made landfall in the U.S. on Cudjoe Key (near Big Pine and Summerland Keys) in the morning of September 10, still being a category 4 hurricane, and made a second landfall on Marco Island, south of Naples, on the same day as a category 3 hurricane. This paper describes the lessons learned by the authors when deploying wave gages and cameras to observe the wave run-up.
Published
2018-12-30
How to Cite
Jafari, N. H., Chen, Q. J., Johnson, C., Cadigan, J., & Harris, B. (2018). LESSONS LEARNED FROM RAPID DEPLOYMENT OF WAVE GAGES AND CAMERAS DURING HURRICANE IRMA. Coastal Engineering Proceedings, 1(36), waves.62. https://doi.org/10.9753/icce.v36.waves.62