RECONSTRUCTION OF SEAWALL ABUTTING A HEAVILY TRAVELED COASTAL HIGHWAY WITHOUT SUSPENSION OF TRAFFIC WITH PRESSED-IN PIPE PILE WALLS

  • Takefumi Takuma

Abstract

National Route 134 of Japan is a scenic coastal highway about 30 miles southwest of downtown Tokyo. Its highly traveled two lane section in the ancient capital city of Kamakura (1.4 km, i.e., 0.85 miles long) is sandwiched by a sandy ocean beach on the south side and a narrow gauge railroad or rock outcrop on the north side. The 50- year old concrete seawall abutting the highway above suffered scour and settlement from a typhoon-caused storm surge in the past with the rest of the seawall also showing heavy deterioration.

References

White, Finlay, Bolton, and Bearss (2002), "Press-in Piling: Ground Vibration and Noise During Piling Installation†, ASCE Special Publication 116

Takuma, Nishimura, and Kambe (2016), "Aseismic and Anti-tsunami Seawalls and Port Structures†, Proceedings of Ports 2016, the 14th Triennial International Conference, ASCE COPRI

Published
2018-12-30
How to Cite
Takuma, T. (2018). RECONSTRUCTION OF SEAWALL ABUTTING A HEAVILY TRAVELED COASTAL HIGHWAY WITHOUT SUSPENSION OF TRAFFIC WITH PRESSED-IN PIPE PILE WALLS. Coastal Engineering Proceedings, 1(36), structures.31. https://doi.org/10.9753/icce.v36.structures.31