LONG-TERM SUBSIDENCE OF BEACH NOURISHMENT AND DUNE RESTORATION IN CAMINADA HEADLANDS, COASTAL LOUISIANA

  • Navid H. Jafari
  • Brian D. Harris
  • Timothy D. Stark

Abstract

Coastal barrier islands are the first line of defense for protecting wetlands, inland bays, and mainland regions from direct effects of wind, waves, and storms. Rosati (2006) indicate that 20 to 40% of the total sand volume can be sequestered and lost from the sandy barrier island through consolidation. As a result, predicting long-term subsurface sediment consolidation is integral to determining the ability of barrier islands to provide coastal protection and resilience to future hazards, such as relative sea level rise, sediment erosion, and hurricanes. This study uses the Caminada Headlands geotechnical investigations and monitoring data to determine empirical correlations for deltaic sediment compressibility and develop a validated and calibrated consolidation and subsidence numerical model for future barrier island restoration projects. With this calibrated model, differential settlements associated with sand fill placement can be estimated to design placement elevations to maintain post-construction topography for ecological habitat and restoration requirements and can be used for future beach restoration projects along barrier island shorelines.

References

Rosati (2006). "Restoration of Barrier Islands Overlying Poorly-Consolidated Sediments, South-Central Louisiana." Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies Transactions, 56, 727-40.

Published
2018-12-30
How to Cite
Jafari, N. H., Harris, B. D., & Stark, T. D. (2018). LONG-TERM SUBSIDENCE OF BEACH NOURISHMENT AND DUNE RESTORATION IN CAMINADA HEADLANDS, COASTAL LOUISIANA. Coastal Engineering Proceedings, 1(36), risk.66. https://doi.org/10.9753/icce.v36.risk.66