THE EFFECT OF OBLIQUE SHOREFACE-CONNECTED RIDGES ON ALONGSHORE TRANSPORT AND SHORELINE CHANGE

  • Kevin Haas
  • Tongtong Xu

Abstract

Shoreface-connected ridges (SFCR) are series of ridges and troughs obliquely oriented towards the shore in the inner-continental shelf. They exist sporadically from Long Island to Florida on the North American Atlantic Shelf with maximum expression on the Delmarva peninsula (Swift et al., 1978), including the western half of Fire Island, NY. The long-term historic shoreline record of Fire Island (e.g., Allen and LaBash, 1997) shows persistent undulations in shoreline shape at an alongshore scale similar to the alongshore scale of the ridges. These ridges and troughs are spaced approximately every 2 to 3 km in the alongshore and occupy a total length about 14 km in the cross-shore direction with an average crest to trough height of 2 m.

References

Allen and LaBash (1997) Measuring shoreline change on Fire Island. Maritimes, 39 (1):13-16.

Swift, Parker, LanFredi, Perillo, and Figge (1978) Shoreface-connected sand ridges on American and European shelves: a comparison. Estuarine and Coastal Marine Science, 7(3):257-273.

Published
2018-12-30
How to Cite
Haas, K., & Xu, T. (2018). THE EFFECT OF OBLIQUE SHOREFACE-CONNECTED RIDGES ON ALONGSHORE TRANSPORT AND SHORELINE CHANGE. Coastal Engineering Proceedings, 1(36), sediment.65. https://doi.org/10.9753/icce.v36.sediment.65